2008-09-11 / Front Page

Crazy Horse School buffalo kill educational to students

Crazy Horse took all their students north of Allen to buffalo pasture to participate in a buffalo kill. Crazy Horse took all their students north of Allen to buffalo pasture to participate in a buffalo kill. ALLEN - Last Wednesday, the entire student body of Crazy Horse School traveled to the buffalo pasture north of Allen to participate in a kill and learn about the cultural significance of the buffalo.

The school held a lottery drawing among the students and Troy Long Soldier, 15 and a sophomore, was selected to take the buffalo down. Al Fast Wolf and Ralph Bear Killer, Oglala Sioux Parks rangers, took Long Soldier in a four wheel truck to locate and shoot the buffalo, which turned out to be a two year old bull.

"I felt really good about it. It was a good experience," said Long Soldier of his experience of the kill. He is the son of Daniella Long Soldier and Lawrence Bettelyoun.

After the kill, the buffalo was brought to the buffalo corral, where the rest of the students waited. They were grouped in a circle to listen to speakers about what the buffalo meant to the people.

Jake Arapaho offered a special prayer for the young buffalo bull which gave it's life and gratitude to the buffalo nation for providing for the people.

Troy Long Soldier was selected through a drawing to participate in the buffalo kill. Troy Long Soldier was selected through a drawing to participate in the buffalo kill. During the prayer, the smell of the smoke of sage and sweet grass was in the air, assembling the students to be attentive and respectful.

Marcel Bull Bear, an Instructor of Oglala Lakota College, sang a tokala for the students and he spoke of the sacredness of the buffalo and what he meant to the people in terms of well being and good health. He pointed out the many uses of the buffalo in meeting the needs of the people at one time. The two most obvious was providing food and shelter to the Lakota people historically.

The hide of the buffalo was used for the covering of the tipi, the robes were used to keep warm and the tanned hide for clothing.

Reginald Little Killer, a Lakota language instructor at Crazy Horse School, told the students the importance of the buffalo today to the environment and the Lakota language.

A prayer song was sung by Bull Bear as the students formed a circle and walked around the buffalo. Each student was allowed to touch the buffalo on the head and some of the students hesitated when it came to their turn to touch the buffalo's head.

Elroy Cross coordinated the event, an event that gave students an educational outing, which they learned historical and practical information in a cultural setting.

Ron 'Beef' Randall and his school kitchen crew and the two rangers expertly skinned the buffalo and cut up the meat. The buffalo meat was taken back to Crazy Horse School, where it was used to feed the people for the annual Back to School wacipi the next day.

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